Europe & UK

Exploring Burgundy: Classic Wines & a Bit of Beaune

I had mixed feelings traveling to Burgundy. I was hoping that I would find a magical wine region where I'd fall in love with dedicated winemakers and regional dishes, not something that resembles the Napa Valley of France. Luckily, I did find a magical wine region...winding through tiny little streets, from town to town, I seemed to be the only person on the road and I felt as if I was discovering a secret, even though Burgundy might just be the most famous wine region on the planet! 

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One big issue in Burgundy is getting to a vineyard or getting into a winery. Job number one is finding a winery to see. It is well understood that most winery owners in Burgundy don't care about having tasting rooms and don't care to have their time wasted with your visits. After all, they're busy actually making the wine and tending to the vines! Winemakers in Burgundy are very hands-on and they don't have a huge problem selling their sought-after wines, so you really have to be with a tour, be in the wine industry, or "know someone" if you want to get up close and personal. You also really must have a car (or, again, get in on a small tour) to explore the region the way it needs to be seen, but if you're short on time you can certainly stay in the city of Beaune and still soak up a bit of Burgundy. 

Oeufs en Meurette at Restaurant Le Fleury, Beaune

Oeufs en Meurette at Restaurant Le Fleury, Beaune

When in Beaune, I recommend heading over to Maison Joseph Drouhin for a tour and tasting. You'll get to see the caves and, if you're lucky, you'll also get a great history lesson. After the tour, you'll taste three Chardonnays (their 2013 Meursault was exceptional) and three Pinot Noirs (even some Grand Crus!), some of which are excellent! Afterward, head over to Restaurant Le Fleury, where I had the BEST oeufs en meurette (poached eggs in red wine sauce, an outstanding regional dish) my entire time in Burgundy. For dinner, Le Clos du Cèdre was a fantastic and memorable meal. Since I was on an ouefs en meurette kick, I had to order their fancy deconstructed version...while good, it just wasn't as good as Restaurant Le Fleury. 

You must also stop by La Moutarderie Fallot to tour the Edmond Fallot mustard factory and taste all the mustard you possibly can (unless, of course, you absolutely hate mustard...then you don't need to do this). Thomas Keller taught me about Edmond Fallot and I am forever grateful. It is the best mustard in the world and assists me in the kitchen almost every single day! It's just...the best. 

Ancient wine press, Joseph Drouhin, Beaune

Ancient wine press, Joseph Drouhin, Beaune

Caves at Joseph Drouhin, Beaune

Caves at Joseph Drouhin, Beaune

Vineyard in Vosne-Romanée

Vineyard in Vosne-Romanée

Clos Napoléon, Fixin

Clos Napoléon, Fixin

I absolutely do suggest renting a car, if you can, and spending at least a couple of hours driving through the region. I drove from Lyon to Dijon (Beaune is right in the middle), so I had a chance to see a great deal and it was the best part of the trip! I traveled to Burgundy just before harvest (or during harvest, depending on the vineyard) and saw lots of beautiful, mature fruit hanging on the vines. Since you're out in the middle of nowhere and probably need some sustenance at some point, make a lunch reservation at Au Clos Napoléon in Fixin, where they have an unbeatable atmosphere and view - literally surrounded by vineyards. They also have an excellent version of oeufs en meurette, if you want to stay regional. 

The country roads in Burgundy

The country roads in Burgundy

The famous Domaine de la Romanée-Conti

The famous Domaine de la Romanée-Conti

Vosne-Romanée

Vosne-Romanée

There is so much to see - you just need to show up with an adventurous spirit to get the most out of the region. If all else fails, taste wines in Beaune and Dijon and ask for regional wine pairings with dinner - just taste as much as you can and always, always, always ask the sommelier for his/her help. Get a feel for each appellation, what it offers, and what you do or don't like about those wines. For whatever reason, I seem to always choose reds from Aloxe-Corton and Nuits-Saint-Georges. Maybe it's wrong, but I have strong preferences! And those preferences may or may not change with each vintage. 

There are also so many hidden gems and indescribable landscapes. If you love wine and need a break from Europe's big cities, head to Burgundy right now!!! Also, if you make it up to Dijon (essential if you're heading back to Paris on the train), be sure to make a reservation at Loiseau des Ducs - wonderful, wonderful food and an imaginative, modern wine program. 

By the way, Julia Child has a great recipe for oeufs en meurette in Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Find it under "Oeufs à la Bourguignonne [Eggs Poached in Red Wine]". There is no need for me to come up with a recipe for this...some stuff is just classic and untouchable. If you can't make it to Burgundy, you can at least recreate this fantastic dish at home! 

Copenhagen: Let's Sing a Song About Smørrebrød!

So, sure, Copenhagen = Noma to a lot of chefs (and I get it.), but there is just so much more. Copenhagen was one of my most pleasantly surprising food destinations because I didn't know a whole lot about their food scene before I arrived. I just sort of let people point me in the right direction and show me what they thought I needed to know. 

Let's talk about smørrebrød: a Danish open-faced sandwich. It's usually dark, dense, rye bread topped with amazing ingredients and a little bit of sauce. Simple things are always the best things. Amazing ingredients, which Denmark really has a handle on, make a simple sandwich the most satisfying meal ever. We were instructed to go to Restaurant Ida Davidsen, which seems to be the most famous place to get smørrebrød in Copenhagen. It was excellent and the perfect introduction, but I was more than happy to get smaller and cheaper versions the rest of the trip. The smørrebrød we had at Ida Davidsen was quite large (you can't even see the bread under all the ingredients).

Smørrebrød with smoked salmon, greens, and onions

Smørrebrød with smoked salmon, greens, and onions

Smørrebrød with gravlax and caviar

Smørrebrød with gravlax and caviar

We had an excellent dinner at Restaurant Radio and they, again, focused on perfectly executed local ingredients. Even their bread and butter was pretty amazing - all butter should be whipped with caramelized onions! Restaurants and chefs in Denmark seem to have a real respect for food and keeping the integrity of their region's produce...something I can surely get behind.

Shaved asparagus salad

Shaved asparagus salad

Carrots and dill

Carrots and dill

Scallops with sea foam

Scallops with sea foam

And I just can't forget the Danish. Even though this pastry is of Viennese origin, I had to get a Danish or "spandauer" in Denmark. Holm's Bager was clearly the spot for coffee and pastries. There was a line out the door, but everything else was closed and I was desperate for coffee...so I waited. Little did I know they had the most amazing danishes on the planet:

Copenhagen was so clean and peaceful...I mean, really clean. It was alarming. No wonder all the chefs go out and forage for wild foods, I'd give anything to run around Denmark all day!

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*all photos by Shauna Burke

Recipe: Mushroom Coxinha (Vegetarian)

Coxinha (pronounced koh-sheen-yah) are very popular in Brazil and South America, but I wrote about them in last week's post on Lisbon as a popular street food that I found in Portugal. They are basically chicken dumplings that are molded into "little thighs" and then deep-fried to succulent, crispy perfection. Below is my vegetarian version (which I'm sure can be made vegan with a bit of playing around), made with a mushroom filling and, of course, replacing the traditional chicken stock with vegetable stock or mushroom stock in the dough. They are slightly labor intensive, but with a few extra hands in the kitchen it goes by in a flash and they are fun to form and shape. 

The most difficult part of making coxinha is really getting a feel for the dough - it's one of those things that can sometimes call for more or less flour depending on all kinds of factors, so you have to pay a bit of attention and trust your instincts. It shouldn't be wet and sticky, but it shouldn't be dry either.

Since I was taught to eat these with my favorite hot sauce, that's probably exactly what I'll do until the end of my days. However, I'm sure these would be just as tasty with mustard or your favorite dipping sauce... or even just by themselves!

I am also thrilled to share my friend Nivea Galloway's more traditional chicken coxinha recipe from São Paulo, Brasil, for those of you who might want to make both versions.

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Mushroom Coxinha (vegetarian)


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Mushroom filling and Coxinha dough

Traditional Coxinha


Lisbon: Pastel de Nata e Coxinha

Now that it's officially summer, I can't help but recall the hottest (as in temperature) trip I have ever taken: Morocco and Portugal in the middle of the hottest summer ever. Portugal is a place that I cannot wait to go back to. I regret not spending more time there and I'm a little upset that I didn't have time to tour any wine regions, especially Porto and the island of Madeira, but it was still an amazing trip!

The culinary highlights of Lisbon were simple and, in this first case, extremely touristy. One of the first stops on my list was Pastéis de Belém for their famous pastel de nata, which is basically a Portuguese custard tart (thin, flaky shell filled with creamy custard and baked at a super high temperature so the outside gets crispy and the top gets bubbly and brown). Excuse me while I wipe the drool from my chin - they are insanely good and I have never found another one that comes close. They sell about a million of these little pastries every minute, so you are guaranteed a fresh one when you go. Not to be missed...but do try to go during off hours and start sprinting if you see a tour bus approaching. 

Pastel de nata from Pastéis de Belém, Lisbon

Pastel de nata from Pastéis de Belém, Lisbon

One reason that I loved Portugal so much is the fact that most of the food I had was refreshingly simple. Fresh steamed or grilled fish and shellfish, sardines, salt cod, plain omelets, simple salads...lots of Mediterranean influence in its light simplicity. What more can you ask for on a painfully hot summer day? Oh, the sangria, of course! And I can't forget to mention the coxinha or "little thighs". While coxinha are traditionally a Brazilian/South American street food, they are still very popular in Lisbon and I saw them just about everywhere. They are little deep-fried balls of succulent shredded chicken and are always a simple crowd-pleaser. Next week, I will share a recipe for coxinha courtesy of my beautiful Brazilian friend, Nivea Galloway, and it may be the one and only meat recipe I ever share here - it's that good! 

Coxinha, "little thighs"

Coxinha, "little thighs"

Simple omelet...literally available everywhere at any time.

Simple omelet...literally available everywhere at any time.

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If you want to burn off that pitcher of sangria and enjoy a nice hike with a spectacular view, take the frequent 45-min. train ride from Lisbon to Sintra and visit Palácio da Pena (Pena Palace) and the Castelo dos Mouros (Moorish Castle). The town of Sintra is pretty and quaint and you could set aside a half day or even a full day to explore. For something special, head over to Palácio de Setais (Setais Palace) hotel for afternoon tea or for lunch with an exquisite view. 

Moorish Castle, Sintra, Portugal

Moorish Castle, Sintra, Portugal

View of Pena Palace from the Moorish Castle, Sintra, Portugal

View of Pena Palace from the Moorish Castle, Sintra, Portugal

Triton Gate, Pena Palace, Sintra, Portugal

Triton Gate, Pena Palace, Sintra, Portugal

Lisbon is definitely not without some brilliant fine dining restaurants. One of our more reasonable meals was Alma, where we all chose the very affordable three-course prix fixe option. The space is very unique and the food was all perfectly executed. 1300 Taberna's wildly inventive and beautiful dishes are a must for those who are willing to spend quite a bit more for a culinary adventure. 

After dinner, be sure to head over to one of Lisbon's many Ginjinha, or simply Ginja (pronounced like jin-ja), shops, where you'll want to try a shot of Portugal's famous sour cherry liqueur. When you order, all you have to do is tell them if you want your shot with a cherry (each bottle is actually filled with whole cherries) or without. It may just be a way to promote day drinking, but it's certainly a unique stop that should not be missed. 

Cafe A Ginjinha, Largo São Domingos 8, Lisboa

Cafe A Ginjinha, Largo São Domingos 8, Lisboa

Popular Espinheira brand of Ginja, easily found in the U.S.

Popular Espinheira brand of Ginja, easily found in the U.S.

One last note: Don't forget to take some Portuguese olive oil home with you. It's outstanding!

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*all photos by Shauna Burke

Brussels & Bruges: Gueuze and Waffles

Mussels, fries, chocolate, beer, and waffles - that's basically what I knew of Belgium before I arrived. Oh, and The Smurfs are Belgian. My goal in Belgium was to learn more about beer and I met my goal after about four hours in Brussels. I first went on a tour of Cantillon Brewery, famous for its traditional lambic beers and for being the only remaining brewery in the capital city of Brussels.

Lambic beers are produced via spontaneous fermentation, which means that the beer is exposed to wild yeast (in open air) and allowed to, literally, ferment spontaneously instead of having the brewer(s) add specific yeasts to the batch. Since this method of brewing can open the beer up to bacteria and spoilage, quite a large number of dry hops (a natural preservative) are always used in lambic-style beers. The dry hops still include all of the preservative qualities of the plant without making the beer overly hopped. This produces a dry and sour end result - in my opinion, it's an acquired taste and one that I am still trying to acquire. I did find a great beer made by a new brewery called Vicaris in Dendermonde, Belgium (about 35 min. by car from both Ghent and Antwerp) - it's a Tripel-Gueuze, which is a traditional lambic-style blended with a traditional Belgian Tripel. It has the richness of a Tripel with some tart funkiness of a lambic. The best of both worlds, for me. 

Bruges is a lovely little town and a short train ride from Brussels. I visited De Halve Maan brewery, which has a history dating back to the 16th century although they have only been operating at their current location since 1856. They are the last brewery left standing in Bruges and their beer is actually GREAT. 

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The view from the roof of De Halve Maan brewery.

The view from the roof of De Halve Maan brewery.

Beautiful Bruges

Beautiful Bruges

Honestly, the best part of Bruges was this perfect Liege waffle pictured below. There is just no sense in having another kind of waffle ever again. Sometimes when I'm in Manhattan and I happen to pass by the Wafels & Dinges truck, I'll get a waffle just to have a special little moment with the memories of this waffle pictured here...unfortunately, nothing will ever compare, but Wafels & Dinges is the only one that has come close. Why so good, you ask? Liege waffles are made with a yeast dough (not a batter) and pearl sugar. Pearl sugar = big bits of sugar that melt and caramelize when the waffle dough is cooked in a super hot cast iron mold. So, to sum up, this waffle was amazing and may have changed my life and everything else forever. 

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I had some delicious mussels, fries, and chocolate in Belgium as well, but the real purpose of the destination was beer education. One place that definitely shouldn't be missed is Délirium Café, a bar in Brussels known for their insanely long beer list. Spending an hour here might be a beer education on its own. (Délirium Café: Impasse de la Fidélité 4, 1000 Bruxelles)

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*all photos by Shauna Burke

Istanbul: Homeless Kitties, Spices, and 5 a.m. Prayer

I'm still not entirely sure why, but I fell in love with Istanbul - and fell hard. I read somewhere that Istanbul is the city of contradictions, which I have to agree with and that makes up a great deal of its charm. On one side you have very traditional, religious, and old-fashioned, while on another side you have very modern, liberal, and progressive. It's crowded, but peaceful. Instead of skyscrapers, there are minarets. And the city is surrounded by water. It is hard to ignore the 5 a.m. wake-up call every morning and the seemingly endless homeless furry kitties. Sarah McLachlan might want to start "Project Cat-stantinople" to get all of these kitties to nice homes. 

Blue Mosque ( Sultanahmet Camii), Istanbul

Blue Mosque (Sultanahmet Camii), Istanbul

The Spice Bazaar was beautiful and I did not care that it was touristy - I am a tourist, after all. I love getting lost in places like this and really pay attention to what I'm seeing. There is always a new ingredient to learn about and something new to file in my brain. I went crazy for all the teas and chiles. 

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On my way up from the Spice Bazaar, I decided to stop into a restaurant that was recommended by some friends, NAR Lokanta. I wanted a good, quiet meal outside of the bustling center of town and this was the perfect choice. It's located on the 5th floor and has a beautiful, peaceful terrace. The food was delicious and the service was fantastic, as is most service in Istanbul. One of the highlights, for me, were these squash blossoms stuffed with rice and spices. SO good! Of course, I have had stuffed grape and cabbage leaves, but the squash blossoms were so wonderful and tender. 

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I had some terrible "Turkish coffee" in the U.S. and had sworn it off since. I had to hope that Turkish coffee in Turkey would be, you know, good... and it was sooooooo good. I don't normally sweeten my tea or coffee, but this little sugar and caffeine jolt was most welcome. Oh, and I can't forget the baklava...baklava....everywhere! The former Ottoman Empire is credited with inventing baklava, so there were endless stores, stands, street vendors, and trucks dedicated to selling baklava. Talk about a sugar rush.

Turkish coffee

Turkish coffee

Turkish tea

Turkish tea

Baklava everywhere!

Baklava everywhere!

As strange as it may be, I became obsessed with döner kebap (you know, meat roasted on a vertical spit) in Belgium of all places. In Turkey, their street food version is served in a tombik pide (literally "fat pita", because it is gosh darn enormous) like a sandwich, similar to Greece's gyro that we know and love. Served along side an Efes Pilsen, just lovely. 

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I can't wait to go back to Istanbul!

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*all photos by Shauna Burke

Mosel & Rheingau: Riesling Royalty and a Tiny Volkswagen

I used to have a serious distaste for Riesling. I just absolutely despised it...and now I refer to it as the only still white wine I truly care about! The dry Rieslings of Alsace are what first drew me in (at first, I never knew that "dry" Riesling existed), then I moved over to the dry German Rieslings. It has now come to a point that a bit of residual sugar is actually welcomed and the thought of aging these white wines is very appealing to me. 

Starting in Trier, Germany, I drove a tiny Volkswagen on the beautiful route to Bernkastel-Kues, which is a picturesque town on the Moselle river and also right in the heart of the Mosel Valley wine region (home of the famous Dr. Loosen winery, among many others). This area is known for its steep vineyard slopes and it seems that every available inch of land is covered in grapes. I tasted some fantastic Spätlese Riesling, including Dr. H. Thanisch Bernkasteler Doctor, Fritz Haag, and Willi Schaefer. The 2011 Bernkasteler Doctor Spätlese Riesling became one of my favorites since it started with a hint of sweetness but finished dry. It had a great balance and was the only wine that I ended up ordering more than once. 

Grapes as far as the eye can see...

Grapes as far as the eye can see...

This is directly off the main road - vineyards circle the town and wrap around houses. Grapes literally line the entire river from the main road all the way to the top of the hills.

This is directly off the main road - vineyards circle the town and wrap around houses. Grapes literally line the entire river from the main road all the way to the top of the hills.

I can't forget the dramatic Burg Eltz, which is about 45 min. from Trier by car. For me, nothing beats the interior of a nice English castle, but the exteriors of a lot of German castles are seriously beautiful - and unique. 

Burg Eltz (Eltz Castle), Münstermaifeld, Germany

Burg Eltz (Eltz Castle), Münstermaifeld, Germany

These beautiful country roads...

These beautiful country roads...

From Bernkastel-Kues, I drove about an hour and a half east (towards Frankfurt) to Assmannshausen and Rüdesheim on the Rhine river. This area is home to, you guessed it, more Riesling, which seems to have more depth and minerality than some I tasted in the Mosel Valley. It is also home to some great quality German red wine, Spätburgunder, which is better known as Pinot Noir. I am told that August Kesseler is the go-to for a consistently good Spätburgunder, but I also tasted a decent one from Georg Bruer and Krone. I wanted to try drier Riesling, which Georg Bruer did have several of - I ended up, of course, liking their Spätlese Riesling and also ended up buying a bottle of Auslese Riesling to age. 

Weingut Georg Bruer

Weingut Georg Bruer

Georg Bruer Spätlese Riesling 2011

Georg Bruer Spätlese Riesling 2011

Grabenstraße 8, Rüdesheim 

Grabenstraße 8, Rüdesheim 

Vineyards in Rüdesheim am Rhein directly off the Rhine river

Vineyards in Rüdesheim am Rhein directly off the Rhine river

Overlooking the Rhine river

Overlooking the Rhine river

Not quite ready to turn into wine...

Not quite ready to turn into wine...

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*all photos by Shauna Burke

Luxembourg City: Crémant and Michelin Stars

I'll be honest: I did not have much of a desire to spend a lot of time in Luxembourg since I had always heard that it was relatively boring to the average tourist. I took the high-speed train from Strasbourg to Luxembourg City with the sole purpose of picking up a rental car since France wouldn't let me take one across the border - weird, right? Luxembourg may be the richest country in the world and have the most Michelin stars per capita, but what surprised me the most was that their sparkling wine, Crémant de Luxembourg, is so much better than I remember! It was crisp, clean, and hearty - definitely something I want to have around the house. There are so many other crémant-producing areas that are much more popular, like Alsace and Bourgogne, that perhaps Luxembourg gets a bit ignored in the U.S. 

As an actual tourist destination, I admit it may be a bit boring. It seems like a place where a lot of business, not sightseeing, is done. It is, however, a beautiful city. Very clean. Very quiet. It would actually be perfect for a one-night break between visiting other tourist-infested European cities.

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Of course, how could I be in a city with the most Michelin stars per capita and not try one of these restaurants? I took the advice of several people and tried Mosconi, a two-star Italian establishment tucked away on an adorable little street overlooking a river. The food was wonderful and the service was impeccable, of course. I highly recommend it. See below.

Truffle macaron w/ chicken liver; bleu cheese mousse; mortadella cracker

Truffle macaron w/ chicken liver; bleu cheese mousse; mortadella cracker

Gnocchi with mint ketchup (Unbelievable. I wanted a plate of these.)

Gnocchi with mint ketchup (Unbelievable. I wanted a plate of these.)

Bacalao

Bacalao

Buffalo ricotta, broad beans, tomato sorbet, basil

Buffalo ricotta, broad beans, tomato sorbet, basil

Octopus, Parmigiano potato puree, olive oil, squid ink

Octopus, Parmigiano potato puree, olive oil, squid ink

Keep in mind: the secret to being able to afford many two and three-star dining experiences is to go for lunch on a weekday - many restaurants offer a small tasting menu for a fraction of the price, catering to the "business lunch" crowd. I can hardly handle a seven-course tasting menu anyway, so I love any opportunity to enjoy these dining experiences with much smaller portions and prices. 

The view next to Mosconi, 13 r. Münster, Luxembourg City 

The view next to Mosconi, 13 r. Münster, Luxembourg City 

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*all photos by Shauna Burke

Alsace: Route du Vin and Tarte Flambée

Just to get into the Alsace region, we flew into Strasbourg, France (the main city in Alsace) and I can honestly say that I am glad this city was not our base. While it was lovely, it was simply too big and had far too many chain stores for me to get that "small town" vibe I was hoping for. After one short night, we hopped on the train to Colmar, France (about 25 min. south via train), which felt so much more manageable and quaint compared to Strasbourg. This was our base. 

Alsace is right on the German border, which explains why the two cuisines are so similar. Lots of sausage, stewed meat, sauerkraut, and potatoes. After about a day, this type of food does nothing but weigh you down! One Alsatian specialty, that I'll admit I had no idea belonged to Alsace, was the tarte flambée: very, very, very thin dough crisped up in a wood-fire oven and traditionally topped with fromage blanc, thinly sliced onions, and lardons. With a variety of toppings to choose from, a tarte flambée is, comparatively, lighter and cheaper than some of the other dishes available. This definitely became the go-to shared dish on the trip.

Tarte flambée in Colmar

Tarte flambée in Colmar

Beautiful street in Colmar

Beautiful street in Colmar

Les Petite Venise, Colmar

Les Petite Venise, Colmar

From Colmar, the ideal plan is to rent a bicycle or car to get to some of the nearby small towns on the Route du Vin, like Riquewihr, Kayserberg, and Ribeauville, just to name a few. These towns are not serviced by train or any reliable public transportation, which can catch some tourists off-guard. While many wineries do require appointments for tastings or tours, there are actually several larger wineries that are open daily to the public: Hugel & Fils in Riquewihr and Maison Trimbach in Ribeauville are two very popular Alsace wineries that tourists tend to be familiar with. I did visit the Hugel & Fils tasting room in the adorable town of Riquewihr, which is a postcard town if I've ever seen one. Another perk of stopping in Riquewihr is that most of the vineyards are open to the public and entrances/pathways are located at the end of just about any street.

Vineyard in Riquewihr

Vineyard in Riquewihr

Notice the proximity to the main street!

Notice the proximity to the main street!

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One thing that I do love about France is that you will always find a great food market, no matter how small the town. I have to say I totally forgot that Munster cheese also comes from Alsace. What a treat it was to be reminded of that fact when about a hundred pounds of it was served atop one of our tarte flambées!

Beautiful Munster cheese

Beautiful Munster cheese

Paté in Riquewihr

Paté in Riquewihr

Even though this was a wine tour, I felt like being a rebel and thoroughly enjoyed one too many local Fischer beers with my also one too many tarte flambées. Definitely ready to cross the German border to swim in some Riesling! 

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*all photos by Shauna Burke

London: Maltby Street & Borough Markets

London's food markets are some of my favorite markets to visit on a regular basis. The reason for this might just be that everyone speaks English (I know, I'm sorry.) and can get away with so much that we can't in the U.S. Sort of a "so close, yet so far" situation. Borough Market has basically existed since the 11th century and is a must-do - enormous selection, endless wandering, and always a crowd.

Maltby Street Market, on the other hand, is newer and much, much, much smaller. What originally drew me to Maltby is Fergus Henderson's St. John Bakery - they participate in "open door Saturdays" and have an array of baked goods (including amazing bread) available to the public starting at 9am. I went for the fresh donuts (lemon curd or rhubarb...or both) and boxed wine. Typical breakfast, right? Directly behind the bakery is Maltby Street Market, which is just a small street lined with excellent local vendors - one of the highlights was some delicious smoked salmon that was hanging on a rack outside and topped with some fine English crème fraîche. 

I was also excited to find a great small batch gin, Little Bird, "lovingly distilled in London" - the type of thing that'd be too small to find at Borough. 

St. John Bakery, 72 Druid St., London SE1

St. John Bakery, 72 Druid St., London SE1

St. John's fresh lemon curd doughnuts

St. John's fresh lemon curd doughnuts

Hansen & Lydersen's smoked salmon 

Hansen & Lydersen's smoked salmon 

Borough Market, just on the other side of London Bridge (a short walk from Maltby Street) is the place to go if you have a desire to wander around and snack on endless goodies (as in, ask for a taste of everything that you walk by). Everything looks amazing and you just have to go on an empty stomach to really enjoy yourself. The photos below are evidence enough. 

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*all photos by Shauna Burke